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Tru-Colour Bandages – Bandages for Every Kid or Adult!

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As a parent of a biracial child I find it hard to find items, and products that he can identify with or relate to. So I was happy when I heard about True-Colour bandages. Once I received the package with the bandages I set-out to message my friends about it. Also, letting them know that the bandages were inspired by an adoptive dad who couldn’t find bandages in diverse colors for his children because he only found beige, and “cartoon” bandages. Hence, creating different skin tones of bandages with the slogan “diversity in healing.”

Disclosure: I received a Tru-Colour bandages for the purpose of reviewing it. I did not receive monetary compensation for this review. All opinions stated below are my own or of those who tried out the bandages.

Interested in wanting to know my mommy friend’s input and feedback I sent them samples of True-Colours, and asked for their’s and their kid’s reaction. 

I asked them the following questions:

Did you like the quality of the bandages? Did your children like the diversity in color? Would you buy the bandages for your children? If so, why? Quality, price, diversity in color? Do you feel it’s important to to have bandages that match your’s or your children’s skin color? Would you recommend this product to someone else? Please share any other thoughts or comments you or your children may have had. 

Tasha, Mother of 3

Here is her children’s reaction:

Jasper(10 yrs. old) had difficulty opening the package. He didn’t really notice a difference. When I asked him if it matters what color the bandage is, and if  the bandage stood out or not. His response was that he didn’t care. He liked having a bandage, because people ask what happened.   Olivia (almost 3 yrs. old ) Likes the bandage, but she likes stickers. She said she likes Dora better. Sophia (baby 7 weeks old) doesn’t care. But the tone really blended in with her skin.
My opinion:  Unless I have a need to cover something on my face, I don’t really care what type of bandage I use. Now on my face, I think having the various colors will be nice, because the ‘issue’ will be less noticeable. But if the cost of these are significantly higher that the other bandages brands, I probably would not buy them.  Thanks for the opportunity to test them out.

Chondra, Mother of 3

I love the quality of the bandages and the different colors they match each person in my household very well. I definitely enjoy being able to match my son who has a darker skin complexion. I would buy the bandages for the good quality and especially the diversity of the color. In some aspects it’s important to have bandages to match you skin complexion because you don’t have to worry about people asking you what happened to you. I would recommend this to my family and friends. Thanks I love them! 

Yadira, Mother of 2

My kids were wowed with the colors of the bandages. They said,  “This is Daddy’s color, and this is peach (lighter tone) is Mami’s color.  This is my because we are mixed. Which I thought was funny. But so far we haven’t had to use the bandages. Thanks God.

Beth, Mother of 1

We tried the bandages last night and we really liked the color options – we were able to find a color that perfectly matched my daughter’s arm and she was excited about that! My one suggested improvement would be the “stickiness” factor. They didn’t hold too well and came off a little too easily. I’m sure if I was using them for more than a few hours and my daughter was playing, they would have fallen off. As far as purchasing them,  I would not buy them just because I’m not sure they’d be effective on staying put on my child with how active she is.  However, I do think it’s important to have a bandage the same skin color as my child – I loved that about the bandages! I don’t think I can recommend the product at this time because of the adhesiveness factor.

Alleyah, Mother of 2

My family and I loved the diversity in colors.  Great quality! However, I couldn’t match my color. If they are the right price I would buy them. I didn’t care much about finding bandages that match our skin color, but the kids loved it. I never really thought about having a bandage to match my skin. I would recommend this product to someone else. 

 A special thanks to my mommy friends for their honest reviews! To learn more about Tru-Colour bandages click here.

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Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop #22

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Welcome to the Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop!

The Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop is a place where bloggers can share multicultural activities, crafts, recipes, and musings for our creative kids. We can’t wait to see what you share this time!

As the creator of the Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop, and I’m thrilled to be co-hosting this month with Multicultural Kid Blogs, and the wonderful bloggers from:  Crystal’s Tiny Treasures All Done MonkeyCrafty Moms Share For the Love of SpanishEva Varga, and Tara Kamiya

Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop is a place for you to share your creative kids culture posts. It’s very easy, and simple to participate! Just follow these simple guidelines:

  • Follow us via email, Pinterest, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook. Please let us know you’re following us, and we will be sure to follow you back.
  • Link up any creative kids culture posts, such as language, culture, books, travel, food, crafts, playdates, activities, heritage, and holidays, etc. Please, link directly to your specific post, and no giveaways, shops, stores, etc.
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop
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  • Please grab the button code above and put it on your blog or the post you’re linking up. You can also add a text link back to this hop on your blog post. Note: By sharing your link up on this blog hop you are giving us permission to feature your blog post with pictures, and to pin your link up in our Creative Kids Culture Feature board on Pinterest.
  • Don’t be a stranger, and share some comment love! Visit the other links, and comment. Everyone loves comments!
  • The Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop will go live on the 3rd Sunday of the month. It will run for three weeks. The following blog hop we will feature a previous link up post, and if you’re featured, don’t forget to grab the button below:
Creative Kids Culture Blog Hop
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Here’s my favorite from last time:  In my never-ending search for Spanish children’s book I was excited to come across Entre Compras y el Hogar’s review on “Te lo Regalo.”  This is a sweet story about sharing, and generosity. 

te lo regalo Libro: Te lo Regalo!


Thank you for linking-up, and we can’t wait to see what you’ve been up to!   

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Dia de los Muertos/Day of the Dead Unit Review

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Until I moved to the U.S.A. I had never really heard about Día de los Muertos (as it’s celebrated here in the U.S.A. and Mexico). Not knowing much about the celebration perse, I was thrilled when my friend Becky at Kid World Citizen came out with a Day of the Dead Unit.

Note: I received a complimentary copy for purposes of this review. All opinions are exclusively mine. 

In Puerto Rico the Catholic church celebrates on November 1st All Saints Day, and on November 2nd Misa a los Fieles Difuntos (All Souls Day). During these two days the church celebrates a special Mass service in church and/or at the cemetery. As you can see it’s a pretty simple prayer service.

Deeply rooted in the Catholic beliefs Day of the Dead is a celebration of the life, and remembrance of our loved ones who have passed away. Greatly celebrated in Mexican culture, and across the U.S.A. during November 1-2 this celebration entails skulls, ofrendas, marigolds, and altars for our loved ones that have passed on. Becky does a great job at explaining these elements in her unit.

This unit is full of valuable information on learning about Day of the Dead.  It’s perfect for our Spanish Homeschool lessons, and I’ve been able to use this with his friends as well during the Spanish playgroup.  It’s geared towards children in PreK, Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade. The kids in his group are 4, 5, and 6 yrs. old. 

Her unit has book suggestions, pennants that you can print, and decorate.  I loved that I was able to print out a coloring book that’s in both English and Spanish for the kids (see below).  With this unit your children will learn about the celebration of the Day of the Dead, history, culture, literacy, math, and science (did I mention the skeleton your kids can put together)?  Everything you’ll need to celebrate Día de los Muertos can be found in this unit.

This has been such a valuable resource for both my son, our Spanish homeschool and myself.  If you’re interested in getting this unit go to her TpT store

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Happy anniversary Multicultural Kid Blogs! Instagram and Blog Hop

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Two years ago I started blogging about discovering the world through my son’s eyes as a way to connect with my extended family, and along the way I gained another family on Multicultural Kid Blogs! I’ve met some wonderful mamas, and made some great friends! Today we celebrate Multicultural Kid Blogs’ second anniversary with an around the world Instagram Blog Hop, and a giveaway!

Until recently I had no clue what Instagram was, and I didn’t feel a need to sign-up to yet another social media. Nevertheless, my curious nature led me to join Instagram, and I’m so happy that I did! Instagram has been a way for me to connect with other families across the world.  I’ve shared glimpse of our multicultural world through pictures, and snapshots that necessarily don’t make it the blog. 🙂 They are simply a way to share our world, and connect with others.

Want to join in on the fun? Be sure to visit our wonderful co-hosts, plus enter our giveaway and link up your Instagram profile! Follow and use #mkbkids on Instagram! We’ll be sharing our favorite Instagram photos with this tag on the MKB website and Facebook page!

Happy anniversary Multicultural Kid Blogs!!!

Blog Hop Co-Hosts

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Happy Birthday U.S.A.!

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Every year our multicultural familia celebrates 4th of July with a BBQ at home. My husband goes all out barbecuing, and we have fun playing in the pool, and cooling off.
A fun craft to celebrate this day is of course, a simple U.S.A. flag craft. Little one has been doing some flag crafts during summer camp.  
Below you’ll see two simple flag crafts: 
  1. Print & color a flag, and glue a cardboard “stick”
  2. Laminate a white sheet of paper and have your child make finger prints of the flag 
As a member of the Multicultural Kid Blogs, I am so excited to be participating in the World Cup for Kids series. Each blogger will be writing about each participating country, and we will be sharing some fun and educational resources on the U.S.A. 
Here’s a list of our posts for U.S.A.:
This is our last post for the World Cup for Kids Series since U.S.A. didn’t make it through to the finals. However, please do check the Multicultural Kid Blogs for the most current updates and post on each participating country. You’ll find a wealth of educational information for your children. Also, if you’re like me, and love Pinterest take a look a the MKB World Cup for Kids Pinterest board
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Latinas for Latino Lit Día Blog Hop with René Colato Laínez

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The L4LL Día Blog Hop
I am so excited to participate in the Latinas for Latino Lit 2nd Annual Latino Día de los Niños, Día de los Libros Blog Hop!

I am joining forces with 24 Latina bloggers to bring to you 24 Latino authors, and illustrators.

As a strong advocate of Latino children’s book I am so honored to introduce to you René Colato Laínez one of our favorite Latino children’s author in our home!

REFLECTIONS/ REFLEXIONES


A few years ago, The Utah Humanities Book Festival asked me the following question: “What kind of idea are you?”


This was my response:


I am the idea of Go get it! It is right there waiting for me. I am not afraid. I know that I can do it. I walk towards that goal with a positive spirit. Sometimes it might be windy or freezing or the earth may shake. But my steps are sure and strong. If I fall down, I get up. If there is a rock blocking my way, I roll it down the hill. If there is a river, I cross it. No matter what, at the end of the journey my goal is there waiting for me. The immigrant child, who came from El Salvador to the USA with a backpack full of dreams, has accomplished all of them. Now he is a teacher, a teacher full of stories. He is also an award-winning author. That child is me, René Colato Laínez. So everyone, go get it!


*


When I was child, I had two dreams to become a teacher and to write a book. I wanted to be a teacher because I was always impressed to see how they could transform a child from a non-reader to an eager reader. Teachers had the magic to touch the future and I wanted to be one of them. I wanted to write a book because my mother’s uncle, Jorge Buenaventura Laínez- https://openlibrary.org/authors/OL992121A/Jorge_B._La%C3%ADnez, was an author in El Salvador. He wrote on the last page of his family biography, Los Laínez de la Soledad: “This is not the end of the Laínez. I know that new generations will grow and I want one of those Laínez to continue the tradition of writing.” I read this when I was twelve years old and I felt that Tío Jorge was pointing at me to be the next writer in the family. So, I promised myself that one day, I would write a book.


But then, a civil war started in El Salvador and my family had to immigrate to the United States. I came with a backpack full of dreams, eager to convert those dreams into reality. In El Salvador, I was an excellent reader. I was great with numbers. But in my new school in the USA, I felt that I was a dumb student. Everything was upside down. Teachers were using letters instead of numbers to grade the students. Math was so confusing, I did not know that new way of multiplying and dividing numbers. Students wrote the date backward 5-12-1985. “Today in not December 5th,” I said. One of the students rolled his eyes as he said, “You don’t even know today’s date.” When I found the word “once” at the beginning of a book, I read it as the number eleven in Spanish and I was shocked to find out that it was not only eleven, it was also time. So, I sat on my desk very sad and asked myself, “Will my dreams become a reality in the United States?”


I believed in myself. I did my best and I did not give up. Soon, I was learning and in a few years I was graduating high school with honors! I was accepted to a four-year university. In 1993, eight years after I left El Salvador, I accomplished my first dream. I became a teacher.


Now I was ready for my second dream, to publish a book. It was the year 2000 when I submitted my first manuscript. The road to publication was not easy at all. I received tons of rejections letters. But I believed in my work. I did my best and I did not give up. I took a creative writing class and I did a MFA in Writing for Children for Children and Young Adults at Vermont College of Fine Arts. In 2002, Arte Público Press gave me my big chance. I was so thrilled to receive a book contract for my picture book manuscript, Waiting for Papá/ Esperando a Papá. The book was published on October 31st, 2004. Yes, I accomplished my second dream. I was an author!


This is my tenth year anniversary as a published author. It has been ten wonderful years of writing, visiting schools, doing reading all around the United States and even in my native country El Salvador. I have met and become friends with many authors and illustrators. I have published nine books. Two more are coming in 2015. I have participated in an anthology. I have published poems and stories in Iguana Magazine and in many educational reading programs.


Yes, I did it as an illegal immigrant child with no English at all at the beginning of my journey.  So now I say to all the children and adults, go get it! Go for your dreams. Believe in yourself. Do your best. Do not give up. I know that your dream is right there waiting for you.


Saludos,

René Colato Laínez

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Cinco de Mayo A Celebration of Mexican Culture and Heritage

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I am so honored to be a member of the Multicultural Kid Blogs, and to be writing for them on Cinco de Mayo Celebration and the Influence of Mexican Culture in the U.S.  
While researching I was blown away by the statistics, and how the Mexican population is growing by leaps and bounds in the U.S.A. So it comes to no surprise on why Cinco de Mayo is such a huge celebration in the U.S.   To read more about it click on the link below, and Happy Cinco de Mayo! 

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The Easter Story and Resurrection Eggs {Spanish Activity}

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With Easter around the corner I planned a very special Spanish Activity with Resurrection eggs for my son’s Spanish playgroup.  
Every other week we have a Spanish children’s workshop, and I usually have a theme. This time it was Easter. I couldn’t find a book in Spanish, but we did have at home the The Easter Story by Patricia A. Pingry.  It’s a perfect book for little ones that explains the story of Easter without going into the specific details of Jesus’ death, but it does explain that Jesus died, and resurrected on the third day. 

As I read the book I translated to them in Spanish, and to better explain Jesus’ resurrection we had an activity with plastic eggs. They actually sell the Resurrection Eggs, and on Pinterest you’ll find loads of ideas on how to make your own.  However, I  was looking for something simpler, and in Spanish. I didn’t find it in Spanish, but I did find a simple,and very easy to make and frugal resurrection eggs here.  I wanted to make 4 sets. One for each child.  As I read the story in Spanish I had them reach out for a colored egg, and open it.  
Each colored egg represented a different event. I translated into Spanish this sheet that I found here
  • Huevo azul – contiene pequeñas palmas plásticas.  Representan cuando Jesús llegó a Jerusalem (Mateo 21:1-19). Dios nos ama tanto que nos envió a su único hijo Jesús para librarnos y traer paz. 
  • Huevo púrpura – contiene una galleta.  Los niños se la comen y representa la última cena que Jesús tuvo con sus doce discípulos. (Mateo 26:17-19, 26-30). 
  • Huevo amarillo – contiene dos clavos.  Los niños hacen una cruz con los clavos.  Jesús fue crucificado en la cruz por nuestros pecados. Jesús murió por nosotros para que todo el que crea en El tenga vida eterna. (Juan 19:16-22).
  • Huevo verde – contiene una piedra (roca).  Representa la piedra que fue usaba para clausurar la tumba de Jesús.  Los seguidores de Jesús estaban muy triste porque el había muerto. (Mateo 28:1-2). 
  • Huevo anaranjado – está vacío. Representa la tumba vacía y la buena noticia de que ¡Jesús vive! Jesús subió al cielo y resucitó al tercer día.  (Mateo 28:5-8). 
This is a beautiful activity that you can do with your children in Spanish.  
Happy Easter! 
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